The Disaster Recovery Handbook: A Step-by-Step Plan to Ensure Business Continuity and Protect Vital Operations, Facilities, and Assets

By Michael Wallace; Lawrence Webber | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
CRISIS MANAGEMENT PLAN
Minimizing the Damage

Lost time is never found again.

— Benjamin Franklin


INTRODUCTION

The first moments of an incident that disrupts the business are ones of executive anxiety. There is little reliable information and a great need to take immediate action. But what should be done? What is an overreaction, and what is too little too late? In an after-hours emergency, the first plan to execute is the Crisis Management Plan. It describes those first important steps to take until more specific information becomes available.

This plan describes the initial steps for dealing with an adverse situation. Guidelines are provided for initial notification and executive actions required during the incident as the functional experts begin the recovery processes. There is much to do in a short time! Customers must be reassured that their products will still be delivered on time—or assisted with finding alternate sources. Employees will want to know how they can help. The insurance adjuster may require that nothing moves until the company reviews the damage. The news media are arriving and deciding how they can tell your story for the greater entertainment of their audiences. The list of executive actions is long and the list contains little information about containing and remediating damage. That is left for other teams. The executive team must focus on external communications, overall coordination of the recovery, and taking care of the entire employee population.

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