The Disaster Recovery Handbook: A Step-by-Step Plan to Ensure Business Continuity and Protect Vital Operations, Facilities, and Assets

By Michael Wallace; Lawrence Webber | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 19
CUSTOMERS
Other People to Worry About

If we don’t take care of the customer… somebody else will.

—Author Unknown


INTRODUCTION

Successful businesses are built on the basics: supplying customers with the products and services that they want, when they want them, and at a price they are willing to pay. What would they do if you could not supply them with what they needed to run their business? How many times could this happen before their confidence in you as a supplier is eroded or fails altogether? Good customers are hard to find. It is always cheaper to keep the ones you have than to find new ones. Don’t wait until it is too late! Action steps must be identified to support your customer in the face of a disaster in your facility. A disaster plan that considers the customer is important!

The most basic step is to develop a customer notification plan. Properly implemented, such a plan builds a valuable image in your customer’s mind about your company and its usefulness to them. We have all experienced troublesome suppliers to our own businesses and value the ones that do not create problems for our operations. When a disaster strikes, it is imperative that your company’s hard-won reputation not fall victim to the calamity. You must consider the disaster’s impact on your customers and act decisively.

Our plan development steps by now should sound familiar. List what you want to protect, what the threats are, and then take mitigation actions to reduce the likelihood of the occurrence or the severity of a disaster. Of course, you then need to test it. A successful customer notification plan will strengthen the relationship between you and your customer. Just as your parents told you,

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