The Disaster Recovery Handbook: A Step-by-Step Plan to Ensure Business Continuity and Protect Vital Operations, Facilities, and Assets

By Michael Wallace; Lawrence Webber | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 23
HEALTH AND SAFETY
Keeping Everyone Healthy

Our health always seems much more valuable after we lose it.

—Author Unknown


INTRODUCTION

A step-by-step approach to analyzing your business situation and developing written procedures for avoiding problems or reducing their damage should they occur includes consideration of environmental, health, and safety issues. Issues that affect the health and safety of your employees and the surrounding community are becoming much more high profile, as the investment community evaluates corporate sustainability reports with the same level of scrutiny as the financial reports. Environmental and safety disasters have the potential to cost much more than the immediate damages; these disasters can tarnish brand names, force closure of operations in a community because of distrust, or become the subject of every anti-industry blogger on the Internet. This chapter will help you identify the plans you may need to protect your employees and the public from hazards in the workplace.


PLANS ADDRESSING HEALTH, SAFETY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

The emergency action plan is the most basic plan that should be developed for any workplace. Health, safety, and environmental issues are the focus of many emergency plans. Multiple federal agencies require emergency plans. This plan should address fires, evacuations, and sheltering during natural disasters. It may also include plans for responding to workplace violence. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has an especially helpful eTool on its Web site

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