Index
abstention, 17; and autonomy, 96–101; and character, 67; and civic virtue, 40–41; and deference, 96–101, 101–4, 105; and epistocracy, 95–96; and freeriding on good government, 38–39, 64–65, 77; and loss of pleasure, 75; rationality of, 33–34. See also duty to abstain
aggregation. See miracle of aggregation.
Althaus, Scott, 164, 168–69, 172
altruism, 162. See also sociotropic voting.
Barber, Benjamin, 100
Barry, Brian, 19
Becker, Gary, 50
belief. See justification, epistemic.
bias: and bad voting, 10, 69, 70–71, 105, 171–75; economic, 171–75; and the educated, 104; incumbent, 170; motivated reasoning, 70, 174–75; position, 170. See also systematic error
bigotry, 10
blank ballots, 76–77
Brennan, Geoffrey, 20, 36–40, 46, 56–57, 62, 78, 187n6
Brink, David, 89
Burtt, Shelley, 45
Caplan, Bryan, 28, 108, 110, 168, 171–75, 196n18, 197n26, 204n39
causation, 28–30, 32, 34, 190n29
checks and balances, 127
Chisholm, Roderick, 134
Christandl, Fabian, 171
Christiano, Thomas, 96, 185n8
citizenship, nature of, 44, 62–64, 148, 193n39. See also civic virtue; duty to abstain; duty to vote.
citizenship exam, 87
civic humanism, 8, 44, 191n2
civic virtue, 12, 46; concept vs. conceptions of, 45; definitions of, 45–46, 48, 191n3, 192n14; demandingness of, 60–61; and duty to vote, 18, 40–42, 43, 44, 65–66, 66; extrapolitical conception of, 13, 44, 49–62, 63; and motivation, 59–60; paid exercises of, 151; and political participation, 45–47, 54; republican conception of, 44, 46–48, 52, 56, 191n2; and “schlivic” virtue, 48–49; and selfsacrifice, 57–58, 60–61; value of, 49, 193n32; and vote selling, 140–41, 148–50
Clean Hands Principle, 73, 77, 122–23
coalitions, 21, 112, 123–24, 127, 160, 198n20
cognitive diversity, 103. See also Page, Scott
collective harms, 71–77, 88, 121
commodification of votes, 136, 139–40, 147–55
common good: and civic virtue, 45–48; and democracy, 6–7; and the division of labor, 43, 51–52, 53, 65–66; and individuals’ goods, 114–5; nonindividualistic conceptions of, 56–57; promoted by private activities, 50–56; skepticism about concept of, 113, 116; and specialization, 55; theories of, 12–13, 47–48, 56–57, 115–19; and vote selling, 139–40, 142, 152; and voting, 4–5, 12, 68, 70–71, 76, 79, 82, 84, 86–88, 91, 112–13, 119–24, 124–28, 143–44, 161–63. See also civic virtue; duty to abstain; duty to vote.
communitarianism, 45, 63, 118
compulsory voting, 185n7
Condorcet Jury Theorem, 189n21, 194n2
contrary-to-duty imperatives, 134
“correct voting, “167
Crittendon, Jack, 46–47
cross-cutting exposure, 175–76, 204n37
Dagger, Richard, 46–47, 192n18
deadweight loss, 121, 198n13
debts to society, 12, 43, 44–45, 49, 51–54, 56, 58–59, 65, 140, 142, 193n44
deliberative citizens, 175–76
democracy: and autonomy, 8, 97–101; as decision-method, 8; definitions of, 8, 186n18; educative function of, 103; justifications of, 8, 110, 115–17; and rentseeking, 127; reverence for, 3, 8, 153, 155; value of, 8–9, 37, 62–63, 76, 100, 110; and violence, 8, 84, 88, 117, 119. See also Tale of the Slave

-213-

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The Ethics of Voting
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction Voting as An Ethical Issue 1
  • Chapter One- Arguments for a Duty to Vote 15
  • Chapter Two- Civic Virtue without Politics 43
  • Chapter Three- Wrongful Voting 68
  • Chapter Four- Deference and Abstention 95
  • Chapter Five- For the Common Good 112
  • Chapter Six- Buying and Selling Votes 135
  • Chapter Seven- How Well Do Voters Behave? 161
  • Afterword to the Paperback Edition How to Vote Well 179
  • Notes 185
  • References 205
  • Index 213
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