The Inner Life of Empires: An Eighteenth-Century History

By Emma Rothschild | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
COMING HOME

The next period of the Johnstones’ lives was the time of their greatest prosperity. John, Elizabeth Carolina, and their servants arrived in England in the spring of 1766, after a more than usually eventful journey, in a vessel later described by the Company as a “crazy” ship. The Admiral Stevens made a slow progress through the Indian Ocean (“baff ing winds and rain with large confused swell”), stopped for New Year's Eve at the Cape of Good Hope, where an Indian sailor, “Canro Mahomet Lascar,” died, another sailor, “Miralabdi Lascar,” ran away, and one of the passengers, an aspiring merchant, bought seaweed, birds, and rhinoceros horn. They also stopped at St. Helena, where some stowaways from the garrison “swam off in the dusk of the Evening,” and at Ascension Island, where the ship's crew caught a turtle that was said to have contained two thousand eggs. They were carrying a tiny horse and mare for the Prince of Wales (“no more than thirty Inches high”), and the mare was discovered to be “very big with foal.” They encountered a ship going from Cadiz to New England, another ship going from Bristol to Barbados, and a Dutch East Indiaman. The Admiral Stevens spent a month in Lisbon, after its bow opened off the coast of North Africa. On May 9, 1766, it anchored in the Downs.1 John had been away from home for sixteen years.

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The Inner Life of Empires: An Eighteenth-Century History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • To Victoria v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction - Ideas and Sentiments 1
  • Chapter One - Setting out 11
  • Chapter Two - Coming Home 59
  • Chapter Three - Ending and Loss 97
  • Chapter Four - Economic Lives 121
  • Chapter Five - Experiences of Empire 154
  • Chapter Six - What Is Enlightenment? 210
  • Chapter Seven - Histories of Sentiments 263
  • Chapter Eight - Other People 284
  • Acknowledgments 303
  • Appendix - Children of James Johnstone and Barbara Murray 307
  • Abbreviations 309
  • Notes 311
  • Index 469
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