Life and Work in Modern Europe (Fifteenth to Eighteenth Centuries)

By G. Weulersse; Eileen Power et al. | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

AN increasing interest in social and economic problems has been one of the most marked characteristics of the twentieth century, and has led, among other things, to an increasing demand for books dealing with the economic history of the past. It is perhaps true to say that all the great movements of history have had an economic side, masked more or less completely by other and more picturesque motives and often, no doubt, outweighed by them. But in the modern world economic motives have tended to drop the mask and to become steadily more powerful; and almost all the serious problems with which society finds itself faced to-day are in their essence economic. For this reason it is difficult not to feel an interest in their historical evolution, and, indeed, dangerous to be wholly ignorant of it.

In general, however, the interest in economic history in England has tended to confine itself entirely to the British Isles, and the increased study of European political history, which has been so marked of late years not only in schools and universities but among the general public, has rarely been extended to the study of European economic history, at any rate prior to the nineteenth century. This is to some extent, though less so, true also of the study of economic history in the United States. That it should be so is in many ways unfortunate. On the one hand, just as modern industrial and commercial problems are largely international in scope and cannot properly be understood except on an international basis, so the economic problems of the past usually require for their right understanding to be studied internationally. It is true that the sixteenth century ushered in an era of national states, whose violently egocentric policies, wars, and balances of power kept Europe in turmoil; but at the same time that developed and self-conscious nations thus appeared upon the stage of history, there also appeared a developed and equally

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Life and Work in Modern Europe (Fifteenth to Eighteenth Centuries)
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations xii
  • Foreword xiii
  • Introduction - THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL REVOLUTION AT THE BEGINNING OF THE MODERN ERA (FIFTEENTH AND SIXTEENTH CENTURIES) 1
  • Chapter I - SPAIN AND PORTUGAL 18
  • Chapter II - THE NETHERLANDS 42
  • Chapter III - ENGLAND 56
  • Bibliography 119
  • Chapter IV - FRANCE 120
  • Bibliography 247
  • Chapter V - ITALY 248
  • Chapter VI - SWITZERLAND 280
  • Chapter VII - GERMANY AND AUSTRIA-HUNGARY 288
  • Chapter VIII - THE SCANDINAVIAN STATES 309
  • Chapter IX - POLAND--RUSSIA 330
  • Conclusion 343
  • Index 385
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 398

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.