The Other Alliance: Student Protest in West Germany and the United States in the Global Sixties

By Martin Klimke | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

THERE ARE PERFECT BOOKS and those that actually get published. This work has been written in the latter spirit, viewing itself as the beginning rather than the final word on the many discussions that are being opened up in the following pages.

It took me about ten years to gather the sources for this book and finish the manuscript. During this time, I have enjoyed the unwavering support of my family, friends, and colleagues, who have been an integral part of this journey from the very beginning. A special expression of gratitude goes to my colleagues at the University of Heidelberg, both in the Department of History and in the Heidelberg Center for American Studies (HCA). The HCA invited me as a research fellow in 2005 and has been my academic home for several years. I am especially indebted to Detlef Junker, who cordially welcomed me to Heidelberg in 2001 and let me pursue this project, supporting and guiding my work both intellectually and on a personal level over the years in ways too numerous to mention. Also in Heidelberg, Wilfried Mausbach and Philipp Gassert’s comments on matters of substance and style, as well as my intense academic discussions with them over the years, have helped me navigate the turbulent waters of the sixties on both sides of the Atlantic and have profoundly shaped this work.

I owe further gratitude to Akira Iriye of Harvard University. His insights into the global dimensions of American history, our many exchanges over the years, and his constant personal support have been an important part of my intellectual development and were of enormous benefit to this book. Also in Cambridge, my affiliation with the New Global History initiative and Bruce Mazlish’s encouragement inspired me to see the value in a broadened historical perspective. It also led me to reframe my conclusions about the transnational dimension of 1960s protest in the spirit of a global history. Likewise, the scholarship and comments of Daniel Rodgers of Princeton University have guided and greatly enriched this work over the years.

This book is also a product of a transatlantic cooperation between the University of Heidelberg and Rutgers University, N.J., where I had the privilege of spending two academic years as a visiting scholar and adjunct lecturer. The generous support of the Volkswagen Foundation allowed me to conduct my work in the company of fellow academics, whose coop-

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The Other Alliance: Student Protest in West Germany and the United States in the Global Sixties
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1- SDS Meets SDS 10
  • Chapter 2- Between Berkeley and Berlin, Frankfurt and San Francisco the Networks and Nexus of Transnational Protest 40
  • Chapter 3- Building the Second Front the Transatlantic Antiwar Alliance 75
  • Chapter 4- Black and Red Panthers 108
  • Chapter 5- The Other Alliance and the Transatlantic Partnership 143
  • Chapter 6- Student Protest and International Relations 194
  • Conclusion 236
  • Notes 247
  • Sources 325
  • Index 329
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