The Other Alliance: Student Protest in West Germany and the United States in the Global Sixties

By Martin Klimke | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

The men who create power make an indispensable
contribution to the nation’s greatness, but the men
who question power make a contribution just as
indispensable, especially when that questioning is
disinterested, for they determine whether we use
power or power uses us.

John F. Kennedy at Amherst College,
October 26, 1963

We are not hopeless idiots of history who are unable
to take their destiny into their own hands…. We can
create a world that the world has never seen before; a
world that distinguishes itself by not knowing wars
anymore, by not being hungry anymore, all across the
globe. This is our historical opportunity.

Rudi Dutschke, TV Interview, December 3, 1967

You could strike sparks anywhere. There was a
fantastic universal sense that whatever we were doing
was right, that we were winning. And that, I think,
was the handle—that sense of inevitable victory
over the forces of Old and Evil…. We had all
the momentum; we were riding the crest of a
high and beautiful wave.

—Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing
in Las Vegas, 1971

THE ERUPTION OF STUDENT PROTEST in the 1960s was a global phenomenon, the magnitude of which was acknowledged by contemporary observers, enthusiastic supporters, and fierce critics alike. A CIA report on “Restless Youth” from September 1968 stated, “Youthful dissidence, involving students and nonstudents alike, is a world-wide phenomenon…. Because of the revolution in communications, the ease of travel, and the evolution of society everywhere, student behavior never again will resemble what it was when education was reserved for the elite…. Thanks to the riots in West Berlin, Paris, and New York and sit-ins in more than twenty other countries in recent months, student activism has caught the attention of the world.”1

-1-

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The Other Alliance: Student Protest in West Germany and the United States in the Global Sixties
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1- SDS Meets SDS 10
  • Chapter 2- Between Berkeley and Berlin, Frankfurt and San Francisco the Networks and Nexus of Transnational Protest 40
  • Chapter 3- Building the Second Front the Transatlantic Antiwar Alliance 75
  • Chapter 4- Black and Red Panthers 108
  • Chapter 5- The Other Alliance and the Transatlantic Partnership 143
  • Chapter 6- Student Protest and International Relations 194
  • Conclusion 236
  • Notes 247
  • Sources 325
  • Index 329
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