Addiction by Design: Machine Gambling in Las Vegas

By Natasha Dow Schüll | Go to book overview

9
BALANCING ACTS:
The Double Bind of Therapeutics

A GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS MEETING is underway on the second floor of a small commercial plaza a few miles east of the Strip. A real estate agent in a maroon pants suit and a braided gold necklace tells the group that she leaves her home every morning unsure if she will gamble or not. “In between my appointments, something might push my buttons and trigger me to play at any moment. I’m not sure what would set me off. It feels dangerous out there.”

A middle-aged man in blue jeans and a sweatshirt picks up on this sense of danger. “I know the [GA] rules—don’t go to casinos, don’t be around [gambling] machines—but I live in Vegas, so how is that possible? I like to go to a bar to have a drink sometimes, but I can’t seem to do that without there being a damn machine there staring back at me. Hell, you go to the drugstore and they have them. Every time I fill my prescriptions I run the risk of getting stuck for hours at the machines.”

“The grocery store is open all night,” says a petite woman in her sixties. Gripping the large shiny purse on her lap so hard that her knuckles turn white around her rings, she admits how terrified she is to go shopping by herself when her husband, a successful banker, is out of town on business. She prays in the parking lot outside of Lucky’s supermarket, repeating to herself, I have to eat, I have to eat, then hurries past the video poker machines that flank the entranceway.

-239-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Addiction by Design: Machine Gambling in Las Vegas
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 442

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.