The AMA Handbook of Project Management

By Paul C. Dinsmore; Jeannette Cabanis-Brewin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 11A
Studies in Project Quality Management
Achieving Business Excellence Using Baldrige, Business Process
Management, Process Improvement, and Project Management

ALAN MENDELSSOHN, RESOURCES GLOBAL PROFESSIONALS

MICHAEL HOWELL, ASQ IBM GLOBAL BUSINESS SERVICES

In today’s challenging global economy, many businesses are straggling just to stay alive. Even those that survive are finding it more difficult to achieve sustained profitability. No matter what the type of business, no matter what product or service is provided, an organization exists to serve its customers in an efficient and effective way. And when done right, the business will be more profitable.

So what is the secret to success? There is none. What it takes to be successful, what is referred to as “business excellence,” is nothing more than good, common-sense business management, coupled with strong leadership, discipline, and a lot of hard work. Over the years, however, organizations have honed their skills to be able to better implement those things necessary to serve customers.

In the last thirty years, there have been many buzzwords used to describe different approaches to achieving business excellence. Some of the more familiar are Quality Improvement, Total Quality Control, Quality Management, TQM, Process Improvement, ISO 9000, Six Sigma, Business Process Management (BPM), Lean, Lean Six Sigma, Baldrige, and even the more generic term Continuous Improvement. And, there are many other names specific to particular organizations

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