The AMA Handbook of Project Management

By Paul C. Dinsmore; Jeannette Cabanis-Brewin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12
Human Resource Management in Practice
LEE TOWE, PMP; INNOVATORS, INC.The PMBOK® Guide, Fourth Edition, continues to present a view of human resources focused on the people who carry out activities to complete the project; in other words, the human resources—also known as the project team. Project Human Resource Management consists of four processes that organize and manage the project team. Stakeholders who are not project team members are addressed in other sections of the standard.1 However, the fourth edition has added significant coverage of interpersonal skills under the “Develop Project Team” and “Manage Project Team” processes. Expanded coverage of the stages of team building, conflict management, leadership, influencing and decision making was introduced, as was a lengthy appendix on interpersonal skills, covering topics such as:
Leadership
Team building
Motivation
Communication
Influencing
Decision making
Political and cultural awareness
Negotiation.

Compared to earlier editions of the standard, the 2004 edition added a monitor and control process called “Manage Project Team.” All areas of project management involve tracking plans against results, and human resource management is no exception. While the phrase “manage project team” may be somewhat vague, the alternative working name “monitor project team” gave the undesired impression of too much oversight. The primary change in the 2008 standard is that the Manage

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