The Minangkabau Response to Dutch Colonial Rule Nineteenth Century

By Elizabeth E. Graves | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
SECULAR EDUCATION IN THE 1840S TO 1860S:
THE ERA OF LOCAL INITIATIVE

Bothpolitical administration and the coffee cultivation program opened opportunities for Minangkabau literate in Malay to advance within the colonial system. Typically, those who responded most enthusiastically were the social and geographic groups traditionally associated with the merantau process—that is, middle-level socioeconomic groups, particularly from hill-country villages. Geographically, the villages tended also to be located in areas important for coffee cultivation. The intensity of Minangkabau interest in bureaucratic jobs increased as it became more obvious that here was another important means to power, prestige, and wealth. Compared with many other archipelago groups, the Minangkabau had an additional advantage in that their own language was almost identical with the so-called Bazaar Malay which had become the lingua franca of Dutch diplomacy, administration, and commerce in the Indies since the days of the VOC.

Before about the 1870s, the Minangkabau element in the colonial bureaucracy was small and, with the exception of the warehousemaster, jaksa, and, perhaps, the so-called “indigenous secretary,” the jobs did not attract more than lower-middle level groups. Established, well-to-do merchant or artisan families usually preferred to follow their traditional vocations, though recognizing the advantages which the new, colonial situation presented. Specifically, such families found that a smattering of secular education could often be useful to their own pursuits; once children had acquired enough skill to keep the books or copy correspondence, they withdrew from school to enter the family business. The Minangkabau chiefs, both government-appointed and adat, rarely displayed more than a perfunctory interest in education, because their own positions were

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Minangkabau Response to Dutch Colonial Rule Nineteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 235

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.