The Minangkabau Response to Dutch Colonial Rule Nineteenth Century

By Elizabeth E. Graves | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
THE GENEALOGY OF THE NEW ELITE:
A CASE STUDY

As mentioned earlier, a major problem in determining the course of secular education in the nineteenth century and its impact on the villages and people of Minangkabau is the lack of data. The available evidence suggests that middle-level merchant and artisan families, that is to say, those groups with an already developed merantau tradition, were the ones who took advantage of secular education, and that, conversely, the families of penghulu and government chiefs showed less interest. But it is difficult to document this.

One way to overcome the lack of documentation is to examine genealogies of the families that became successful in the civil service and the professions in the twentieth century and then work back along the path by which they achieved those positions. This is difficult because many families apparently do not keep a written genealogy and even if they do only the women’s children are listed, because only they belong to the matrilineage. Constructing a genealogy which takes into account the occupations of the men, whether brothers or husbands, uncles or fathers, is thus no easy task. But gather the family women around the kitchen fire or the men around a table over a cup of coffee, and one can eventually pull out of their collective consciousnesses an almost complete background of the various village families, for at least several generations back.

Tracing Minangkabau genealogies is interesting not just for the light it sheds upon the rise of particular bureaucratic or professional families, but, at the same time, for what it tells about Minangkabau society itself. One can see through the genealogies, for instance, how the matrilineal organization could be as easily manipulated to multiply the options of a given youth as to check his progress (the implication in many twentieth-

-207-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Minangkabau Response to Dutch Colonial Rule Nineteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 235

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.