Contemplative Nation: A Philosophical Account of Jewish Theological Language

By Cass Fisher | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This project has been long in the making and I have been extremely fortunate to have excellent teachers and friends to guide me through its development. At the earliest stages, it was Frederick Sontag, John Hick, and Charles Zeltzer who set me on a path that has afforded me the luxury to spend my days reflecting on and nurturing my deepest commitments. Without their support and encouragement this work would not have materialized. My debt of gratitude to Michael Fishbane and Paul MendesFlohr is truly beyond words. They both introduced me to riches within the Jewish tradition that have had a profound impact on my academic and personal life. I hope that my research and my teaching will always provide testimony to the formative influence they have had on me. I have attempted to document my debt to them in the notes of this work, but that is only a pale reflection of what I owe to them intellectually and otherwise. I should make clear that although they have profoundly shaped my engagement with rabbinic Judaism and modern Jewish thought, my expression of the philosophical problems associated with Jewish theology and my efforts to address those issues are my own. I take full responsibility for any shortcomings that might be found in my argument. Paul Griffiths and David Tracy also provided guidance and intellectual resources that were pivotal to the development of my project. Without their help I would have been unable to bring the threads of my argument together. I sincerely appreciate their interest in my work and the generosity with which they shared their time with me.

I was also fortunate to have many colleagues who helped me bring Contemplative Nation to fruition. I would like to particularly thank John Knight and Bill Wright, who read the work in its entirety, and Jamie Schillinger,

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