From Deficit to Deluge: The Origins of the French Revolution

By Thomas E. Kaiser; Dale K. Van Kley | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Even twenty or more years after the event, any set of acknowledgments for a book about the origins of the French Revolution must begin with the series of bicentennial conferences entitled “The French Revolution and the Creation of Modern Political Culture,” especially the first one at the University of Chicago in 1987 on the subject of the political culture of the Old Regime. Organized, as were the others, by Keith Michael Baker, Colin Lucas, the late François Furet, and Mona Ozouf, it was that conference in particular and the volume of its proceedings published in its wake that brought three decades of “revisionist” thought to a climax and made the origins of the great Revolution the “problem” that it remains today. In the case of this volume, the debt is quite concrete. Besides Keith Baker and the coeditors of this volume, two other contributors—Gail Bossenga and Jeremy Popkin—are also veterans of that seminal conference.

In addition to writing their chapters, both Gail Bossenga and Jack Goldstone went well beyond the call of duty in giving the editors’ introduction and conclusion a very close reading, from which those two essays—the bookends of this book, as it were—benefited not a little. It goes without saying that the editors alone remain responsible for the ways in which they mined Bossenga’s and Goldstone’s chapters as well as the others in elaborating the line of argument contained in that introduction and conclusion. In the regretful—and unplanned—absence of any French contributors to the volume, the editors’ introduction and conclusion also benefited from very thorough readings by Yann Fauchois of the Bibliothèque Nationale and Rita Hermon-Belot of the Ecole des Hautes Etudes et Sciences Sociales. Where other individual chapters are concerned, Jack Goldstone wishes to thank William Doyle of the University of Bristol for a very helpful reading of his chapter, Jeffrey Merrick thanks the Wisconsin French History Group for collective comments in reaction to his

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From Deficit to Deluge: The Origins of the French Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 345

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.