America's Corporate Art: The Studio Authorship of Hollywood Motion Pictures

By Jerome Christensen | Go to book overview

6 Post-Warners Warners
Batman and JFK; You’ve Got Mail (1989-1998)

i. Mind the Gap

The space between the last chapter, which ends with the detachment of the famous WB from reference to any Warner brother, living or dead, and this chapter, which begins with an analysis of the use to which the inventive and persuasive Steve Ross put Warners pictures as he refined the art of the deal, represents a leap across twenty years of Hollywood history, which are associated with the emergence and dissolution of the so-called New Hollywood. Those turbulent decades were characterized by the dispersal of authority, by the blossoming of a “renaissance” of smart, stylish, and subversive motion pictures brought to the screen by star directors, such as Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, Robert Altman, Bob Rafelson, and Peter Bogdanovich, and by the countervailing force of corporate consolidation of multiple entertainment platforms, the emergence of the blockbuster mentality, and the rise to preeminence of the marketing model of filmmaking under the concept of the high concept, which presupposes, as Justin Wyatt has argued, that “the logic of the marketplace is clearly the author of [a movie’s] style.”1

The academic historiography of the period continues to debate the relative continuity of the New Hollywood with the Hollywood of the studio era or even with the global extravaganzas that Columbia, Warners, and Paramount have since become. For our purposes, it is important to keep in mind the picture that Thomas Schatz saw in 1993 as he looked out on a landscape where the acquisition of Twentieth Century Fox by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation in 1985, the formation of Time Warner in 1989, and the takeover of MCA by Japan’s Matsushita Electric Industrial Company in 1990 loomed large. Schatz concluded that the refashioning of the industry was not merely a matter of new production and marketing strategies; it involved the conglomeration of film companies into larger entertainment corporations and of entertainment corporations into global media giants. A major reorientation had occurred as “the vertical integration of classical Hollywood, which ensured a closed indus-

-280-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
America's Corporate Art: The Studio Authorship of Hollywood Motion Pictures
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 390

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.