The Anglosphere: A Genealogy of a Racialized Identity in International Relations

By Srdjan Vucetic | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Writing is a way of interacting with many significant Others. Foremost among those who have guided me in this writing project are Ted Hopf, Jennifer Mitzen, and Alexander Wendt. No trio will have a greater influence on my professional and intellectual development. I was truly lucky to have them on my side for all these years: Without their unfailing encouragement, there would be no book. That it isn't better is entirely my doing. My luck continued when Peter Katzenstein expressed interest in my manuscript; I am very grateful for the extensive comments and criticism he offered.

I took my ideas to many conferences, workshops, and impromptu gatherings, where I met a number of wonderful scholars, who kindly helped me with this project. For written comments and correspondence, thanks are due to Tarak Barkawi, Emilie Bécault, Duncan Bell, Janice Bially Mattern, Zoltán Buzas, Bridget Coggins, Tom Dolan, Andrew Gamble, Eric Grynaviski, Yoram Haftel, Lene Hansen, Clarissa Rile Hayward, Richard Herrmann, Dane Imerman, Tahseen Kazi, Markus Kornprobst, Ronald Krebs, Autumn Lockwood Payton, Tim Lücke, Kim Richard Nossal, Dorothy Noyes, Inderjeet Parmar, Brian Pollins, John Oates, Marc O'Reilly, Thomas Risse, James Rosenau, Stéphane Roussel, Anna Stavrianakis, Robert Vitalis, Michael C. Williams, Byungwon Woo, Clément Wyplosz, Dvora Yanow, and Lorenzo Zambernardi. Special mention must be made of Brendon O'Connor, who facilitated my research in Australia in every conceivable way. As for David Dewitt and Arthur Rubinoff, I simply cannot adequately credit the importance of the advice I received from them over the years. In the broadest sense, I am also indebted to all the scholars appearing in my bibliography.

-vii-

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