The Anglosphere: A Genealogy of a Racialized Identity in International Relations

By Srdjan Vucetic | Go to book overview

1 WHAT IS THE ANGLOSPHERE?

The Anglo-American relies upon personal interest to accomplish
his ends, and gives free scope to the unguided strength and
common sense of the people; the Russian centers all the authority
of society in a single arm; the principal instrument of the former
is freedom; of the latter, servitude… each of them seems marked
out by the will of heaven to sway the destinies of half the globe
.

—Tocqueville, Democracy in America (1835), Vol. 1, p. 434

If the population of the English-speaking Commonwealth be
added to that of the United States with all that such co-operation
implies in the air, on the sea, all over the globe and in science
and in industry, and in moral force, there will be no quivering
,
precarious balance of power to offer its temptation to ambition
or adventure. On the contrary, there will be an overwhelming
assurance of security… If we are together, nothing is impossible
.

—Winston Churchill, The “Iron Curtain” speech, 1946

Now Mr Churchill is starting his process of unleashing war
(like Hitler) with a racial theory, declaring that only those people
who speak English are full-bloodied nations, whose vocation it
is to control the fate of the whole world… Mr Churchill and his
friends in England and in America are presenting those nations
who do not speak English with a kind of ultimatum
recognize
our supremacy over you, voluntary, and all will be well

otherwise war is inevitable.

—Stalin, a Pravda interview concerning Churchill's
“Iron Curtain’ speech, 1946

THE ANGLO-AMERICAN “SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP” and the “Airstrip One.” ANZUS and the “deputy sheriff.” NOR AD and the “51st state.” These are some of the many representations, official designations, and popular caricatures of the special relationships between the United States on the one hand and Australia,

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Anglosphere: A Genealogy of a Racialized Identity in International Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 253

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.