The Anglosphere: A Genealogy of a Racialized Identity in International Relations

By Srdjan Vucetic | Go to book overview

3 ANZUS, BRITAIN, AND THE “PACIFIC PACT”

I did not like the ANZUS Pact at all.

—Winston Churchill, House of Commons, 1953

New Zealanders belong to a branch of New World civilization,
the main centres of which are Sydney, San Francisco, and
Auckland
the Pacific Triangle.

—Keith Sinclair, A History of New Zealand (1959)

ANZUS works on the tactical level because it feels right.

—Peter Leahy, Australian brigadier general,
testimony to the Australian parliament, 1997

We are a European, Western civilisation with strong links with
North America, but here we are in Asia
.

—John Howard, Australian prime minister, interview 1999

The United States and Australia are separated by geography
and a lot of itbut we're united by common values.

—George W. Bush, American president, 2007

ANZUS (AUSTRALIA-NEW ZEALAND-UNITED STATES), a military pact with claims to collective defense created in 1951, is one of the main institutional expressions of the Anglosphere in the area of international security. The pact is racial in its origins in the sense that its drafters deliberately kept the so-called island states out of what they saw to be an exclusive Anglo-Saxon club in the AsiaPacific. This pact has not quite passed: In contrast to NATO, its European counterpart that in the 1990s and 2000s welcomed a dozen of its Cold War-era enemies, ANZUS never evolved into a larger and more plural “Pacific Pact,” that ephemeral entity unsuccessfully pursued by U.S. diplomats in 1950–1951. In this genealogy, the significance of the pact also lies in its two intramural exclusions: Britain at the creation and New Zealand in 1985–1986. The first development is especially puzzling from the perspective of collective identity.

-54-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Anglosphere: A Genealogy of a Racialized Identity in International Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 253

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.