Money Games: Profiting from the Convergence of Sports and Entertainment

By David M. Carter | Go to book overview

Part I
AT-HOME CONVERGENCE

“At-home” convergence, the most prevalent form of sports and entertainment convergence throughout most of the 1900s, continues to have an enormous impact on consumers’ lives. Centered on home-based activities, this form of convergence has become widespread, its growth accelerating in large part due to technological innovations that have blurred the line between sports and entertainment.

For much of the twentieth century, sports consumption tended to be a onedimensional experience, largely limited to at-venue experiences or the reading of a newspaper’s account of a prior day’s game. However, steady innovation in at-home entertainment has nearly eliminated the gap between the consumption of sports and the consumption of entertainment to the point where the focal point of almost every American home is its “entertainment center.”

Not only are sports available at all hours of the day, it is not uncommon for a sports fan to simultaneously access sports using multiple platforms. A Chicago Cubs fan can now watch his team play live on cable television while concurrently checking his fantasy baseball statistics and listening to streaming, web-based sports commentary—all without leaving the comfort of his family room. It is these same consumers, for whom sports are a powerful and unique driver of content, whose utilization preferences substantially contributed to the evolution of convergence.

This “at-home” convergence, particularly as it relates to the evolution of TV content and video gaming, has greatly expanded the ways in which fans effortlessly consume sports programming. It has also ushered in a new era of personal branding, enabling athletes to monetize their brands through the marketing of goods and services.

In examining how at-home convergence has evolved within American households, it is useful to recall a few critical milestones that shaped the current

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Money Games: Profiting from the Convergence of Sports and Entertainment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - At-Home Convergence 13
  • 1 - Television Content 19
  • 2 - Video Gaming 45
  • 3 - Athlete Branding 68
  • Part II - Away-from-Home Convergence 93
  • 4 - The Internet 99
  • 5 - Mobile Technology 125
  • 6 - Gambling 147
  • Part III - At-Venue Convergence 173
  • 7 - Sports-Anchored Development 179
  • 8 - Venuetechnology 204
  • 9 - Corporate Marketing 229
  • Notes and Index 253
  • Notes 255
  • Index 277
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