Music from a Speeding Train: Jewish Literature in Post-Revolution Russia

By Harriet Murav | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. For other uses of Benjamin’s theses on history in relation to Jewish history and memory, see, for example, Boyarin (1992, 32–51).

2. See Veidlinger (2000); Estraikh (2005a); Shneer (2004); Krutikov (1999); and Shternshis (2006).

3. See Sicher (1995); for a recent collection of essays that includes Babel’s Jewish context, see Freidin (2009).

4. Liberman explicitly mentions Bergelson and other Yiddish writers as part of a comparative analysis necessary for the proper understanding of Babel (Liberman 1996, 10). Ruth Wisse includes both Yiddish and Russian-language writers in her chapter “Literature of the Russian Revolution: From Isaac Babel to Vasily Grossman” (Wisse 2000, 99–129). Yuri Slezkine’s chapter “Babel’s First Love: The Jews and the Russian Revolution” briefly touches on Markish’s Brothers in a wideranging discussion of the role of Russian Jews in the new revolutionary culture (Slezkine 2004, 104–203).

5. He went on to say that their response is “easy to understand: both were innovators, revolutionaries of writing in Yiddish, and Babel’s innovation, which was strongly imbued with Jewish imagery (which was both traditional, derived from the Bible, and everyday, worldly) could not help but please them” (Markish 1994, 169).

6. See his essay of 1926, “Mikhoels,” in (Mandelshtam 1979, 260–63).

7. For a discussion, see also Roskies (1984) and Yerushalmi (1989).

8. On this point and Soviet time generally, see Brooks (2000, 77–82).

9. For other approaches to Mandelshtam and Judaism, see, for example, Freidin (1987); Cavanagh (1995); Katsis (2002); and Vinokur (2008).

10. See Shternshis (2006) and Gitelman (2003).

11. Aleksandr L’vov also challenges this conclusion (2008).

12. The Russian Formalists and Mikhail Bakhtin provide what can be termed an “indigenous” theory for this corpus; the best overview of Russian formalism

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