The New Gilded Age: The Critical Inequality Debates of Our Time

By David B. Grusky; Tamar Kricheli-Katz | Go to book overview

(Some) Inequality Is Good for You

Richard B. Freeman

Economists have a more favorable view of inequality than moral philosophers, theologians, other social scientists, and human beings in general. They do not have a more favorable view of inequality because economists are hard-hearted and care less about the poor than other people, though some economists fit that description. Nor do economists have a more favorable view on inequality because they—or more properly, we—are highly paid beneficiaries of inequality or consultants to corporate America, though again some of us fit those descriptions.

Economists look favorably on inequality because economic analysis stresses that inequality creates incentives that induce people to work hard, invest in skills, and choose work activities where the economy most needs

Richard B. Freeman holds the Ascherman Chair in Economics at Harvard University
and is currently serving as faculty codirector of the Labor and Worklife Program at
the Harvard Law School. He directs the Science and Engineering Workforce Project
at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is a senior research fellow in labor
markets at the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance
and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Science. He received the Mincer
Lifetime Achievement Prize from the Society of Labor Economics in 2006, and in
2007 he was awarded the IZA Prize in Labor Economics. In 2011 he was appointed
Frances Perkins Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.
His recent publications include International Differences in the Business Practices
and Productivity of Firms
(with Kathryn Shaw), Science and Engineering Careers
in the United States
(with Daniel Goroff), Reforming the Welfare State: Recovery
and Beyond in Sweden
(with Birgitta Swedenborg and Robert Topel), and Shared
Capitalism at Work: Employee Ownership, Profit and Gain Sharing, and Broad-
Based Stock Options
(with Douglas Kruse and Joseph Blasi).

-63-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The New Gilded Age: The Critical Inequality Debates of Our Time
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 300

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.