Theaters of Justice: Judging, Staging, and Working through in Arendt, Brecht, and Delbo

By Yasco Horsman | Go to book overview

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Djelal Kadir, Memos from the Besieged City: Lifelines for Cultural Sustainability

Stanley Cavell, Little Did I Know: Excerpts from Memory

Jeffrey Mehlman, Adventures in the French Trade: Fragments Toward a Life

Jacob Rogozinski, The Ego and the Flesh: An Introduction to Egoanalysis

Marcel Hénaff, The Price of Truth: Gift, Money, and Philosophy

Paul Patton, Deleuzian Concepts: Philosophy, Colonialization, Politics

Michael Fagenblat, A Covenant of Creatures: Levinas’s Philosophy of Judaism

Stefanos Geroulanos, An Atheism that Is Not Humanist Emerges in French Thought

Andrew Herscher, Violence Taking Place: The Architecture of the Kosovo Conflict

Hans-Jörg Rheinberger, On Historicizing Epistemology: An Essay

Jacob Taubes, From Cult to Culture, edited by Charlotte Fonrobert and Amir Engel

Peter Hitchcock, The Long Space: Transnationalism and Postcolonial Form

Lambert Wiesing, Artificial Presence: Philosophical Studies in Image Theory

Jacob Taubes, Occidental Eschatology

Freddie Rokem, Philosophers and Thespians: Thinking Performance

Roberto Esposito, Communitas: The Origin and Destiny of Community

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Stéphane Mosès, The Angel of History: Rosenzweig, Benjamin, Scholem

Alexandre Lefebvre, The Image of the Law: Deleuze, Bergson, Spinoza

Samira Haj, Reconfiguring Islamic Tradition: Reform, Rationality, and Modernity

-213-

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