Supreme Court Justice Tom C. Clark: A Life of Service

By Mimi Clark Gronlund | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 17
The Brown Decision and
Civil Rights

We don’t have any army to enforce our opinions.

Tom Clark

THE FIFTIES HAVE TYPICALLY BEEN VIEWED as a bland decade during which a “silent” generation conformed to the norms of the day. But as the late author David Halberstam wrote, stirrings beneath the placid surface would explode during the following decade and bring about dramatic changes in the country.1 Civil rights was foremost among these changes, and the Supreme Court, through the landmark decision Brown v. Board of Education, a catalyst for achieving them.

Although it was not universally recognized, Tom Clark had established himself as a champion of civil rights before Brown was decided. His development into a civil rights advocate was gradual but began early—perhaps starting when he witnessed a lynching at age nine. Eight years later, his choice of the topic “modern slavery” for his speech as Bryan Street High School’s class orator suggests that he was sensitive to the plight of black Americans and felt that they remained in a form of slavery. His views expanded more when, as a young lawyer, he represented a number of impoverished African American clients, such as Charlie Ellis, whose case is described in Chapter 4. In 1944, as president of the Federal Bar Association, he insisted that African American lawyers be admitted as members of that association. And there can be no doubt that President Harry Truman was a powerful influence on his development. Under Truman’s direction, he was deeply involved in writing and lobbying for the proposed Civil Rights Act of 1949. He was the first attorney general to file an amicus curiae brief in a civil rights case (Shelley v. Kraemer). Justice

-180-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Supreme Court Justice Tom C. Clark: A Life of Service
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.