History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent - Vol. 5

By George Bancroft | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII.
THE ADVANCE OF BUEGOYNE FROM CANADA.
MAY–AUGUST 1777.

“THIS campaign will end the war,” was the opinion given by Riedesel; and through Lord Suffolk he solicited the continued favor of the British king, who was in his Ryes “the adoration of all the universe.” Flushed with expectations of glory, Carleton employed the unusually mild winter in preparations. On the last day of April he gave audience to the deputies of the Six Nations, and accepted their services with thanks and gifts. Other large bodies of Indians were engaged, under leaders of their own approval. “Wretched colonies!” said Riedesel, “if these wild souls are indulged in war.”

To secure the Mohawks to the British side, Joseph Brant urged them to abandon their old abode for lands more remote from American settlements. To counteract his authority, Gates, near the end of May, thus spoke to a council of warriors of the Six Nations:

“The United States are now one people; suffer not any evil spirit to lead you into war. Brothers of the Mohawks, you will be no more a people from the time you quit your ancient habitations; if there is any wretch so had as to think of prevailing upon you to leave the sweet stream so beloved by your forefathers, he is your bitterest enemy. Before many moons pass away, the pride of England will be laid low; then how happy will it make you to reflect that you have preserved the neutrality so earnestly recommended to you from the beginning of the war! Brothers of the Six Nations, the Americans well know your great fame and power as warriors; the only reason

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