Police Aesthetics: Literature, Film, and the Secret Police in Soviet Times

By Cristina Vatulescu | Go to book overview
Contents
Acknowledgmentsix
Introduction Zones of Contact: Literature, Film and the Secret Police, 1 Reading a Secret Police File, 11 “Police Aesthetics,” 20 The Road Plan, 241
1Arresting Biographies: The Personal File in the Soviet Union and Romania Preamble: Fragmentary Archives, 27 A Short Genealogy of the Secret Police File, 32 Surveillance Files: Characterization Through Collation, 34 Investigation Files: From Autobiography to Confession, 39 Stalinist Files: How Many of Those Enemies Were Forged, 41 Post-Stalinist Files: The Age of Surveillance, 46 A Note on Foucault, 5327
2The Master andMargarita: The Devil’s Secret Police File The Distinguishing Characteristics of the Devil in 1930s Moscow, 56 Writer Prototypes: Madmen, Apostles, and Secret Police Investigators, 59 Censorship and the Authority of the Word, 63 Stalinist “Fantastic Reality” and Its Textual Practices, 68 Mikhail Bulgakov’s Personal File, 69 Repetitions with Suspect Differences: The Writer as Copyist, 7255
3Early Soviet Cinema’s Shots at Policing Filmmaking and Fingerprinting: Dziga Vertov’s Film Theory and Practice, 78 Hidden and Artfully Exhibited Cameras, 85 The Original Show Trial Film and Its Audience, 88 Alexander Medvedkin: Cinema as Public Prosecutor, 92 The Indistinguishable Crowd: Criminal Challenges to Vision and Visual Technologies, 99 The Forged Party Card: Detaching Photographs, Names, and Identities, 103 Vigilance: The Look of High Stalinism, 108 Legitimizing Cinematic Vision: Socialist Realism, Depth Style and The Party Card, 110 Stalin as Scriptwriter and His77

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Police Aesthetics: Literature, Film, and the Secret Police in Soviet Times
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 247

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.