Race Decoded: The Genomic Fight for Social Justice

By Catherine Bliss | Go to book overview

2 Making Science Racial

WHILE IT WAS ONCE COMMONSENSICAL that the proper sensibility to counter racial discrimination was an emphasis on human universality and colorblindness, in the late twentieth century a shift occurred: the proper corrective to racial discrimination became racial consciousness, a disposition which requires the recognition of difference. As the field of genomics was born at the cusp of this major shift in larger social worldviews, it also became a field that most dramatically reflected it, and which granted this shift the aura of scientific legitimacy. From the late 1990s to the early 2000s, scientific elites steered genomics toward intensive investigation into race. They did so in responding to political pressures, seeking new funding opportunities, managing the field’s image, and dealing with a burgeoning public interest in race. If paying too much attention to race had once been a mark of racism, now ignoring racial difference was heralded as a dangerous perpetuation of racial inequality. Genomic scientists adapted to meet novel demands for public accountability as notions of racism shifted under their feet.

This shift occurred within a broader civic move to include racial minorities and acknowledge minority status. As the political sphere became rife with racepositive measures, scientists moved from population-blind sampling—a protocol in which anybody’s DNA was adequate material—to population-conscious, race-focused sampling. From a race-neutral to an inclusionary, prodiversity protocol, genomics has advanced its science in step with dominant American political positions.

-38-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race Decoded: The Genomic Fight for Social Justice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1- Introduction 1
  • 1- The New Science of Race 19
  • 2- Making Science Racial 38
  • 3- The Sociogenomic Paradigm 70
  • 4- Making Sense of Race with Values 100
  • 5- Everyday Race-Positive 135
  • 6- Activism and Expertise 166
  • 7- The Enduring Trouble with Race 192
  • Notes 207
  • Index 257
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 265

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.