Science in the Spanish and Portuguese Empires, 1500-1800

By Daniela Bleichmar; Paula De Vos et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

A book that was as long in the making as this one cannot help but acquire numerous debts of gratitude to those who helped make it possible. First and foremost, the editors would like to thank Jorge CañizaresEsguerra for his support of the project from its earliest stages. Not only did he agree to chair our panel on science in the Spanish empire at the 2003 Latin American Studies Association meeting in Dallas, Texas, but when we approached him with our idea to bring together scholars in the field for an anthology on Iberian colonial science, he was also very encouraging and agreed to write the introduction to the volume. In addition to his groundbreaking scholarship in Iberian science, Jorge has thus played an important role in mentoring a growing community of scholars in this field as well. We thank him for his advice and support.

We also received aid from others along the way. William Taylor, Paula Findlen, and Susan Deans-Smith generously agreed to review the proposal and provide valuable feedback, and they have been similarly encouraging of the project from the outset. Norris Pope at Stanford University Press has provided excellent editorial guidance and been responsive, communicative, and very supportive throughout each step of the publication process. Emily-Jane Cohen has been similarly efficient and conscientious. We could not have asked for a more positive experience in the publication process. We would also like to gratefully acknowledge the generous subvention provided to help defray publication costs by Peter Mancall, director of the Early Modern Studies Institute at the University of Southern California, and Kenton Clymer, Chair of the History Department at Northern Illinois University. And finally, we would like to thank all of the contributors to the volume. Not only have they provided here excellent examples of their scholarship, but they also have demonstrated collegiality and patience at every turn, and we have enjoyed the opportunity to collaborate with them.

D.B., P.D., K.H., and K.S.

-xxiii-

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