Sephardism: Spanish Jewish History and the Modern Literary Imagination

By Yael Halevi-Wise | Go to book overview

Eight
Sephardic Identity and Its Discontents
The Novels of A. B. Yehoshua

Bernard Horn

“‘Doctor Starkmann?’ Molkho asks a wide-eyed little boy, who is
apparently all alone in the apartment, ‘Doctor Starkmann?’”

A. B. Yehoshua, Five Seasons

Sephardism, as defined in in this book, reveals how gentile and Jewish novelists have used the history of Spain’s Jews to fashion modern national identities of such countries as England, Germany, Spain, Brazil, Mexico, and even India. Such an approach to the experience of Sephardic Jews demonstrates how nations in the process of self-definition have used or accessed this historical experience as a repertoire for interactions between nation-states and what they regard as Others: dramatic historical interactions that assume the form of tolerance, assimilation, inquisition, conversion, expulsion, and even annihilation. The idea of sephardism in the literary works surveyed is hence not only a matter of how Sephardic writers represent Sephardic characters or how particular characters are shaped by Sephardic circumstances in the traditional approach of psychological or sociological analyses. The crux here is not the fact of Sephardic identity, but rather the use of the idea of sephardism as a lens for examining ideological questions regarding the formation of modern nationalism. It is a methodology or perspective that includes the identity of non-Sephardim rather than limiting itself to the identity of Sephardic Jews themselves or the ways in which Sephardic identity feeds into overall Jewish identity.

To understand this critical approach to Sepharad as a methodological platform even in the work of authors who possess an actual Sephardic background like A. B. Yehoshua, it would perhaps help to imagine sephardism as an action rather than a noun or adjective:

(“he sephardizes” or “is sepharded”)—a process that takes us beyond this writer’s very real Sephardic background and the many specifically

-189-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sephardism: Spanish Jewish History and the Modern Literary Imagination
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 360

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.