Ottoman Ulema, Turkish Republic: Agents of Change and Guardians of Tradition

By Amit Bein | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I owe a debt of gratitude to a number of people and institutions. Şükrü Hanioğlu’s extensive knowledge of Ottoman history and thoughtful mentorship have guided me since the beginning of this project. Michael Cook’s erudition and tutoring influenced the way I approached the sources and the writing process. Robert Tignor’s incisive comments and suggestions inspired my work in more than one way. I am also indebted to Muhammad Qasim Zaman, Hossein Modarrassi, Mark Cohen, Abraham Udovitch, and Erika Gilson for their help and support in various stages of my work on the project. A word of thanks is also due to Yossi Kostiner, David Menashri, Michael Winter, and Yaacov Ro’i, who in an earlier stage of my academic career helped initiate me into the field of Middle East studies. I am thankful to my colleagues in the Department of History at Clemson University, particularly Tom Kuehn, Steve Marks, and Roger Grant, for their help and support. I am grateful to Kate Wahl, Joa Suorez, and Mariana Raykov of Stanford University Press for their assistance in the various stages of the book’s production; to the copyeditor, Alice Rowan, for her dedicated work; and to the two anonymous readers from Stanford University Press for their review of the manuscript and for their insightful suggestions and recommendations.

Several libraries and archives assisted me in my research. I thank the staff of the Ottoman Archives (Başbakanlik Osmanlı Arşivi,) the Republican Archives (Başbakanlik Cumhuriyet Arşivi,) the Meşihat Archive (Meşihat Arşivi) the Atatürk Public Library (Atatürk Kitapliği), the Süleymaniye Library, the Center for Islamic Studies (İslâm Araştırmaları Merkezi,) and the Institute for the History of the Turkish Revolution (Türk İnkılap Tarihi Enstitüsü)—all in Turkey. In addition, the British Library and the National Archives (formerly PRO) in London, the Library of Congress in the United States, and the university libraries of Princeton and Clemson were very helpful.

-vii-

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