Ottoman Ulema, Turkish Republic: Agents of Change and Guardians of Tradition

By Amit Bein | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
Contesting Visions of Reform

The Young Turk Revolution opened new avenues for change in many aspects of social, economic, and political life in the Ottoman Empire. The Committee of Union and Progress (CUP), the dominant political power until 1918, assigned the government and state bureaucracies a major role as agents of wide-ranging reforms. The Committee’s state-centered vision of administrative, educational, and social change appeared quite appealing to reform-minded ulema because many of them were convinced that their own agenda could fit well with the program of the CUP. This clandestine opposition organization-turned-dominant-power posited itself as a progressive and transformative force that was diametrically opposed to the alleged inertia of the Hamidian regime. Many reformminded ulema believed that the Unionists could offer crucial help to their campaign for bold, comprehensive, and rapid changes in religious life and institutions. Defensively inclined ulema initially also embraced the reform agenda, at least on the declarative level, albeit with a much more cautious attitude regarding the extent and pace of change. The reformminded camp wanted to redefine the ulema as agents of change whereas their more conservative peers viewed their role primarily as guardians of tradition. These contrasting visions translated into long years of contestation over the future of the religious establishment and its institutions. The court of public opinion and the political arena became major battlegrounds between the two sides over the future of religious institutions, norms, and practices in the Ottoman lands.

The printed word was employed extensively by ulema of all persuasions to disseminate their views and mobilize public support. They founded new journals, contributed articles to the daily press, and published scores of books and pamphlets. The relative liberalization that followed the elimination of the Hamidian censorship in 1908 allowed for lively debates about controversial topics that were formerly barred from the public

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ottoman Ulema, Turkish Republic: Agents of Change and Guardians of Tradition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 212

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.