What's Law Got to Do with It? What Judges Do, Why They Do It, and What's at Stake

By Charles Gardner Geyh | Go to book overview
Figures and tables
Figures
1.1The Attitudinal Model27
1.2Justices’ Votes by Justices’ Ideology28
1.3Simple Pivotal Model31
1.4Pivotal Politics Model31
7.1Mean/Median Frequency of Overrulings in Midwestern, Northeastern, Western, and Southern States, 1975–2004180
7.2Court Size by Tenure Length184
7.3Selection Method by Tenure Length184
9.1Incumbents Challenged or Defeated231
9.2Attack Advertising in State Supreme Court Elections233
11.1Expectations and Beliefs About the Distinctiveness of Judges Tables297
1.1Hypothetical Choices of Three Groups among Three Alternatives22
11.1Expectations of the Characteristics of a Good Supreme Court Justice, Kentucky 2006289
11.2Loyalty toward the Kentucky State Supreme Court, Attentive Public, 2006291
11.3The Impact of Judicial Knowledge on Expectations295

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