Navajo Talking Picture: Cinema on Native Ground

By Randolph Lewis | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I have several institutional debts of gratitude going back to 2003. I began thinking about this subject during a year as a research associate at the School of Advanced Research in Santa Fe, where my partner, Circe Sturm, was a resident scholar. During this year I came across some of the sharpest minds that I’ve ever met: Lawrence Cohen, James Faris, Rebecca Allahyari, Bill Anthes, Gerald Vizenor, James Brooks, Cam Cox, Jessica Cattelino, and Kehaulani Kauanui, the last of whom was a special source of encouragement and insight from which I continue to benefit. I am very thankful for that unpaid but immensely valuable time at SAR, where I wrote much of my book on Alanis Obomsawin and began thinking about a southwestern counterpart.

I was also lucky to have space to develop this project while at the University of Oklahoma, where the Honors College provided research funds and much-needed time to write. I am grateful to President David L. Boren for creating the conditions for my academic labor between 2001 and 2009. On a more intangible level, colleagues such as Julia Ehrhardt, Ralph Beliveau, Karl Offen, Andy Horton, Marcia Chatelain, Carolyn Morgan, and Jane Park sustained my mind and spirit during this period.

Lastly, when I moved to the remarkable Department of American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin in 2009, I was fortunate to have Steve Hoelscher as my colleague and chair. Not only is he an accomplished scholar of Native American photography, but he also secured a precious 1–1 teaching load for my first year. This time was essential in getting me to the finish line of a tricky project. Along with other colleagues inside and outside of American studies at UT-Austin, he has greatly enlivened my sense of intellectual community.

I would also like to thank the Australian film scholar Deane Williams, editor of Studies in Documentary Film, for kind permission to reprint much of chapter 4. I also benefitted from the work of Leighton Peterson, Bennie Klain, Nanobah Becker, and other

-ix-

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Navajo Talking Picture: Cinema on Native Ground
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Indicenous Films ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Series Editor’s Introduction xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • Chapter One- A Brief History of Celluloid Navajos 1
  • Chapter Two- Navajo Filmmaker 49
  • Chapter Three- Reaction 72
  • Chapter Four- Intent 88
  • Chapter Five- Ethics 105
  • Chapter Six- Native Ground 124
  • Chapter Seven- Final Thoughts 161
  • Navajo Talking Picture Production and Distribution Information 175
  • Notes 177
  • Further Reading 209
  • Index 211
  • In the Indicenous Films Series 216
  • Other Works by Randolph Lewis 217
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