The Wild West in England

By William F. Cody; Frank Christianson | Go to book overview

FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF LONDON

After the usual introductions, greetings and reception of instructions, I accompanied the committee on shore at Gravesend, where quite an ovation was given us amid cries of “Welcome to old England” and “three cheers for Bill,” which gave pleasing evidence of the public interest that had been awakened in our coming.

A special train of saloon carriages was waiting to convey us to London and we soon left the quaint old Kentish town behind us, and in an hour we arrived at Victoria station. The high road-bed of the railroad, which runs level with the chimney tops, was a novel sight, as we scurried along through what seemed to be an endless sea of habitation, and I have scarcely yet found out where Gravesend finishes and London commences, so dense is the population of the suburbs off the “boss village” of the British Isles, and so numerous the small towns through which we passed. The impression created by the grand Victoria station, by the underground railroad, the strange sights and busy scenes of the “West End,” the hustle and the bustle of a first evening view of mighty London, would alone make a chapter.

My first opinion of the streets was that they were sufficiently lively and noisy to have alarmed all the dogs in

-28-

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The Wild West in England
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Series Editor’s Preface xi
  • Editor’s Introduction xiii
  • Acknowledgments xxxvii
  • A Note on the Text xxxix
  • The Wild West in England xliii
  • List of Scenes 1
  • The Wild West in England 3
  • Nate Salsbury Joins Me as a Partner 5
  • A Bigger Show Put on the Road 10
  • The Show Is Dumped into the Mississippi 12
  • A Season in New York 14
  • An Ambitious but Hazardous Undertaking 15
  • Seeking New Worlds to Conquer 18
  • The Indians’ Fears Are Excited 20
  • “Off Gravesend” 23
  • Some Anxious Reflections 25
  • Our Reception in England 27
  • First Impressions of London 28
  • Preparing the Exhibition Grounds 30
  • Steaming Up the Thames 32
  • Establishing Our Camp— a Queer Scene 34
  • American Methods of Doing Business Excite Favorable Surprise 36
  • Helpful Influence from Distinguished Persons 43
  • Visit of Mr. Gladstone—Private View by the Grand Old Man 53
  • A Hard-Worked Lion of the Season 56
  • Visit of the Prince and Princess of Wales 59
  • A Private Entertainment for the Prince of Wales 61
  • Our Opening Performance 67
  • Interest without Bloody Accessories 72
  • Visit of Queen Victoria 74
  • Her Majesty Salutes the American Flag 76
  • Presented to the Queen 78
  • Statesmen at the Wild West 80
  • A Rib-Roast Breakfast, a la Indian, to Gen. Cameron 82
  • The Prince of Wales and His Royal Flush 85
  • The Prince Presents Me with a Diamond Pin 88
  • The Princess Rides in the Deadwood Coach 90
  • Close of the London Season 93
  • Our Tour in “The Provinces” 96
  • A Visit to Italy 98
  • The Crowd at Our Opening Performance 108
  • Presented with a Rifle 111
  • English Love of Sport Illustrated 118
  • Honored by the Mayor of Salford 120
  • A Magnificent Ovation 122
  • A Race for $2,5Oo 124
  • An Enthusiastic Farewell 126
  • A Pathetic Incident at Sea 127
  • Our Arrival in New York Harbor 128
  • Appendix 1- Story of the Wild West 135
  • Appendix 2- Photographs, 1885–1887 145
  • Appendix 3- Promotion, Reception, and the Popular Press 169
  • Notes 191
  • Selected Bibliography 203
  • Index 205
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