The Wild West in England

By William F. Cody; Frank Christianson | Go to book overview

STATESMEN AT THE WILD WEST

Of the statesmen and men otherwise eminent who visited the Wild West in these bright summer days—it was a wonderful summer for England—a partial list will be found elsewhere. One of the earliest was John Bright, to whose honored name no Englishman ever thinks of tacking the “Mister.”53 The People’s Tribune met with an unfortunate accident on entering the show, reminding one of William the Conqueror’s when he made that awkward stumble on Hasting’s beach, to the dismay of his followers, who thought it a bad omen, and rose exclaiming: “Lo, here have I already seized two handfuls of this English earth; let us go on, my bully boys, and rope in the re mainder.” That was distinctly clever. John Bright tripped over the rubber mat at my tent portal, and arose, grasping, not the English earth, but the end of his nose, which was bleeding. I was truly distressed at this awkward fall occurring to the venerated leader, and made him as comfortable as possible in my tent until he had got over the shock. Major Burke stood by with much heroism and a bottle of eau-de-cologne and bathed the afflicted spot until the illustrious patient felt all right and able to go to his seat. The news of the accident had spread through the auditorium, and when the “old man eloquent” made his

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The Wild West in England
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Series Editor’s Preface xi
  • Editor’s Introduction xiii
  • Acknowledgments xxxvii
  • A Note on the Text xxxix
  • The Wild West in England xliii
  • List of Scenes 1
  • The Wild West in England 3
  • Nate Salsbury Joins Me as a Partner 5
  • A Bigger Show Put on the Road 10
  • The Show Is Dumped into the Mississippi 12
  • A Season in New York 14
  • An Ambitious but Hazardous Undertaking 15
  • Seeking New Worlds to Conquer 18
  • The Indians’ Fears Are Excited 20
  • “Off Gravesend” 23
  • Some Anxious Reflections 25
  • Our Reception in England 27
  • First Impressions of London 28
  • Preparing the Exhibition Grounds 30
  • Steaming Up the Thames 32
  • Establishing Our Camp— a Queer Scene 34
  • American Methods of Doing Business Excite Favorable Surprise 36
  • Helpful Influence from Distinguished Persons 43
  • Visit of Mr. Gladstone—Private View by the Grand Old Man 53
  • A Hard-Worked Lion of the Season 56
  • Visit of the Prince and Princess of Wales 59
  • A Private Entertainment for the Prince of Wales 61
  • Our Opening Performance 67
  • Interest without Bloody Accessories 72
  • Visit of Queen Victoria 74
  • Her Majesty Salutes the American Flag 76
  • Presented to the Queen 78
  • Statesmen at the Wild West 80
  • A Rib-Roast Breakfast, a la Indian, to Gen. Cameron 82
  • The Prince of Wales and His Royal Flush 85
  • The Prince Presents Me with a Diamond Pin 88
  • The Princess Rides in the Deadwood Coach 90
  • Close of the London Season 93
  • Our Tour in “The Provinces” 96
  • A Visit to Italy 98
  • The Crowd at Our Opening Performance 108
  • Presented with a Rifle 111
  • English Love of Sport Illustrated 118
  • Honored by the Mayor of Salford 120
  • A Magnificent Ovation 122
  • A Race for $2,5Oo 124
  • An Enthusiastic Farewell 126
  • A Pathetic Incident at Sea 127
  • Our Arrival in New York Harbor 128
  • Appendix 1- Story of the Wild West 135
  • Appendix 2- Photographs, 1885–1887 145
  • Appendix 3- Promotion, Reception, and the Popular Press 169
  • Notes 191
  • Selected Bibliography 203
  • Index 205
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