The Future of Transatlantic Relations: Perceptions, Policy and Practice

By Andrew M. Dorman; Joyce P. Kaufman | Go to book overview

6 Germany

From Civilian Power to International Actor

Gale A. Mattox


Introduction

The European security landscape changed dramatically with the end of the Cold War, but perhaps as dramatic or even more dramatic have been the changes over the past several years since the tragic events of 9/li.1 The longer-term consequences of the two events are only now truly evident in the shifts—often quite significant shifts—in the perception of individual countries of their national security identities and impact on the future role of the European Union (EU) and the transatlantic community. There is additionally a perceptible generational change occurring that reinforces and may be expected to propel change in the security paradigm of the past generation. In particular, rising elites perceive their futures within the broader European space and project their activities into the international arenas with an assertiveness that has not previously been the case. The rising new leadership on the continent, most recently in the UK, France and Germany as well as in other countries, reflects this change. Their views of their roles are clearly a departure from their predecessors’. These changes have been reflected in transatlantic relations and may be expected to be even more profound as the Obama administration fully develops its foreign and security policy agenda.

This chapter will focus on the shifts that have occurred in Germany and the impact of these shifts. First, has there been change as a result of an emerging generation raised in a unified, considerably more diverse post-Cold War Germany and more comfortable with a national identity? Second, how has

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