Virginia City: Secrets of a Western Past

By Ronald M. James | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Kelly Dixon, now on the faculty at the University of Montana at Missoula, excavated two of the sites discussed in this text. More importantly, Kelly and I discussed the writing of this sort of book for several years, and we contemplated coauthoring the project. Kelly was kind enough to kick around ideas and edit several of the first chapters, but ultimately coauthoring was not in the cards. Her contribution, however, cannot be understated, and she has my thanks.

Don Hardesty, long-standing professor in the anthropology department at the University of Nevada, Reno, and former president of the Society of Historic Archaeology, has inspired generations of students. His method, his insights, his dedicated hard work, and his kindness—he says “yes” more than anyone I know—has made him beloved by his students. He and I began working on Comstock projects in 1990, although his dealings with the mining district date to much earlier. For two decades we have tackled a variety of topics that have yielded diverse insights. This book is a memoir of twenty years of archaeology, but it consists of observations made while peering over Don’s shoulder. He is the reason this work could be accomplished, and I thank him for all he did on these projects and for inspiring me since I first met him in 1973.

Another common thread to all these projects is the National Park Service of the Department of the Interior. Each of the projects described in this volume was supported by the Historic Preservation Fund, administered by the staff at the Cultural Resources Program of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior. Other agencies, including the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Institute for Museums and Library Services, and the Nevada Foundation for Cultural Affairs, and individuals, including Karen Wells and Jim and Diane Linebaugh, provided financial support, but the National Park Service carried the weight for most of these projects.

Additional help came from students, volunteers, and local residents and agency staff. Besides Kelly Dixon other graduate students contrib-

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