Acknowledgements

I am very grateful to Sarah Dunnigan, Colin Kidd, Theo van Heijnsbergen and Matt Wickman, all of whom read and provided comment on portions of this book in draft. Conversations through the years with Carol Anderson, Carol Baraniuk, Jamie Reid Baxter, Valentina Bold, Joe Bray, Alexander Broadie, Ian Brown, Rhona Brown, John Corbett, Ted Cowan, John Coyle, Cairns Craig, Robert Crawford, the late David Daiches, Bob Davis, Frank Ferguson, Fred Freeman, Richard Finlay, Donald Fraser, Suzanne Gilbert, David Goldie, Katie Gramich, Donna Heddle, David Hewitt, Andrew Hook, Ronnie Jack, David Jago, Robert Alan Jamieson, Lynn Kelly, Innes Kennedy, Simon Kovesi, Frank Kuppner, Nigel Leask, Alison Lumsden, Kirsteen McCue, Margery Palmer McCulloch, Carl MacDougall, Alan MacGillivray, Jim McGonigall, Matt McGuire, Liam McIlvanney, Willie McIlvanney, Dorothy McMillan, James MacMillan, Alan McMunnigall, Willy Maley, Mitch Miller, Glenda Norquay, Donny O’Rourke, Murray Pittock, Chris Ravenhall, Alan Rawes, Alastair Renfrew, Julie Renfrew, Ronnie Renton, Alan Riach, David Robb, Johnny Rodger, G. Ross Roy, Patrick Scott, Ken Simpson, Jeremy Smith, Marshall Walker, Rory Watson, Christopher Whyte, Hamish Whyte, and, most of all, Douglas Gifford, have informed my ideas on Scottish Literature (even if some of the individuals here named will certainly at points disagree, probably vehemently, with aspects of these). I am hugely indebted to the numerous students and scholars of

-vi-

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Scottish Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Series Preface v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Chronology viii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Rise of Scottish Literature 4
  • Chapter 2 - Scottish Literature in Scots 29
  • Chapter 3 - Scottish Writing in English 75
  • Chapter 4 - Intimate Critical Spaces in Scottish Texts 135
  • Chapter 5 - Literary Relations- Scotland and Other Places 171
  • Conclusion 197
  • Student Resources 200
  • Index 224
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