CHAPTER 1
The Rise of Scottish Literature

In the last two decades of the twentieth century self-reflexive scrutiny of the discipline of ‘English Literature’ and ‘English Studies’ became a strongly marked feature in academic study. Within the framework of literary theory, this practice has sought to identify the ideological intent lying behind the rise of English as a subject in the nineteenth century, and its eventual supplanting of the classical humanities as the central arena in which literary criticism was conducted.1 It is fairly obvious that canons, or selections of writers and texts for study on courses and in critical writing, are both inclusive and exclusive, and seek to narrate a cultural ‘story’. A narrative foregrounded in the ‘English’ label is that of one particular nation among others in the British Isles, and yet English courses have long continued to include such ‘non-English’ writers as James Joyce, Dylan Thomas and Muriel Spark.

Might it be, then, that ‘English’ refers primarily to a lingua franca? And if this is the case, what is to be done, for example, with writing in Scots? Is this a different language from English or merely a ‘dialect’ of it? If it is the former, then presumably the need exists for a subject of ‘Scots Literature’? If it is the latter, then why have this dialect and its rich creative literature, along with many other dialects of English, been largely excluded from the study of English literature? In other words, in recent years scholars have worried over the dominant canonical logic lying behind English Literature and its comfortable narrowness, and one of the

-4-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Scottish Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Series Preface v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Chronology viii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Rise of Scottish Literature 4
  • Chapter 2 - Scottish Literature in Scots 29
  • Chapter 3 - Scottish Writing in English 75
  • Chapter 4 - Intimate Critical Spaces in Scottish Texts 135
  • Chapter 5 - Literary Relations- Scotland and Other Places 171
  • Conclusion 197
  • Student Resources 200
  • Index 224
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.