The Politics of Military Occupation

By Peter M. R. Stirk | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
Forms of Military Government

Military government readily appears archaic and not merely because of the increasing preference for such terms as civil administration and international territorial administration to refer to what are in fact instances of military occupation. It appears archaic because of the increasing reality of the involvement of civilians and civilian agencies in military occupation. It appears archaic because the isolation of the occupier from the occupied inherent in the definition of military occupation gives it a caste-like character that is at odds with a world in which it is common to speak of global ‘governance’ or ‘multi-level governance’ where the term governance, especially in the English language, has an elasticity not always easily reproduced in other languages.1 Its ultimate reliance upon coercion further distances it from the emphasis upon persuasion, ‘interstate cooperation and transnational networks’ often associated with the language of governance, even if those who employ such language often readily acknowledge that the institutions of this governance can become dysfunctional or oppressive.2 Despite its conceptual separation from conquest it seems to resemble the form of government depicted by Franz Oppenheimer when he sought to locate the origins of the state in conquest:

The State, completely in its genesis, essentially and almost completely
during the first stages of its existence, is a social institution, forced by a
victorious group of men on a defeated group, with the sole purpose of
regulating the dominion of the victorious group over the vanquished, and
securing itself against revolt from within and attacks from abroad.3

This analogy seems even more plausible in those instances where the occupying forces attain a degree of autonomy that seems to make them look like a state within a state vis-à-vis the power that they represent.4

Yet the caste-like autonomy of military government is, in varying degrees, an illusion precisely because it is the agent of a foreign power and because it is dependent, as are all forms of government, upon the

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Politics of Military Occupation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.