CHAPTER 14
Member states

Member states have joined the EU – with or without the expressed support of their
national populations – in a bid for national advantage. National governments have
concluded that, on balance, their countries would be better placed pooling their
sovereignty and operating inside the Union rather than retaining nominal sovereignty and
operating as free agents outside. The specific arguments for membership have varied
among the twenty-seven states, as has the degree of enthusiasm among ministers and
peoples about belonging to the EU.

In this chapter, we look at the experience of member states according to the stages at
which they joined, ascertaining in the process perceived advantages from and popular
reactions to membership.


The original core countries: the Six

Benelux countries: 1. Belgium

Along with Luxembourg and the Netherlands, Belgium had already had some experience of practical cooperation before it became a founder of the ECSC. The three Benelux countries had been involved in a customs union and this encouraged them to work towards wider economic and political harmonisation. In addition, the governments and peoples of each state knew that they could achieve more by working together than they could by acting on their own, particularly in the economic and political arena.

Belgium has been generally supportive of all moves to closer integration in Europe. Paul-Henri Spaak played a leading role in devising the draft treaties. Since then, the country has been responsible for urging the EC forward in many of its initiatives, not least in the run-up to Maastricht.

Lacking as strong a sense of national identity as some other member states, the Belgians have had no problems with federalist notions. They have seen benefits in advancing more swiftly in that direction. That Belgians favour a federal solution is not surprising, given the country’s federal status. They see it as a means of catering for diversity, and of promoting decentralised and effective government. From this perspective, subsidiarity is an inevitable and desirable element of the federal idea.

Belgians have had few fears of EMU, CFSP and majority voting, seeing all of them as part of the general move towards closer integration, a goal which they warmly embrace. In the interpretation of that goal, Belgian governments have been flexible, accepting that it does not by definition mean that all states must proceed at the same pace or commit themselves to every policy initiative.

Politicians of all shades of opinion and people be they Flemish or Walloon all see benefits in European membership, making the relationship of Belgium and Europe what one writer has called ‘a marriage of love and reason’.1

-250-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The European Union
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Boxes vii
  • Tables viii
  • Maps ix
  • Introduction x
  • Background Information xv
  • Section One- History 1
  • Introduction 3
  • Chapter 1 - The Drive for European Unity to 1973 5
  • Chapter 2 - From Community to Union, 1973–93 30
  • Chapter 3 - Consolidating the European Union, 1993 To the Present Day 49
  • Chapter 4 - The Movement to Integration- A Theoretical Perspective 61
  • Section Two- Institutions 73
  • Introduction 75
  • Chapter 5 - Institutions of the European Union 76
  • Chapter 6 - Policy-Making and Law-Making Processes 97
  • Chapter 7 - Democracy and the European Union 115
  • Section Three- Representation 127
  • Introduction 129
  • Chapter 8 - Elections to the European Parliament 130
  • Chapter 9 - Political Parties and the European Union 152
  • Chapter 10 - Pressure Groups and the European Union 171
  • Section Four- Policies 189
  • Introduction 191
  • Chapter 11 - The Union Budget 196
  • Chapter 12 - First-Pillar Policies 204
  • Chapter 13 - Second- And Third-Pillar Policies 230
  • Section Five- Attitudes 239
  • Introduction 241
  • Chapter 14 - Member States 250
  • Chapter 15 - Britain and Europe- A Case Study 266
  • Conclusion- the State of the Union, Past and Present 277
  • References 294
  • Further Reading 303
  • Index 307
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 318

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.