Postfeminism: Cultural Texts and Theories

By Stéphanie Genz; Benjamin A. Brabon | Go to book overview

5
Postmodern (Post)Feminism

OVERVIEW

This chapter addresses the contentions surrounding the problematic meeting of feminism and postmodernism and explores the theoretical and practical implications of a postmodern feminism. As will be demonstrated, such a conjunctive relationship is fraught with complexities, as ‘it is clear to anyone engaged in these enterprises that neither feminism nor postmodernism operates as one big happy family’ (Singer 471). There is no unified postmodern theory, or even a coherent set of positions, just as there is no one feminist outlook or critical perspective. Instead, one is struck by the plurality of postmodern and feminist positions and the diverse theories lumped together under these headings. There is a variety of different links between feminist and postmodern theory, with the proposals of conjunction ranging from a strategic corporate merger, to the suggestion of various postmodern and feminist versions varying in strength, to the downright rejection of a postmodern feminism. These calls for (non-) alliance often draw upon a reductive conceptualisation and simplification of the two entities and propose a facile distinction between feminism’s political engagement and postmodernism’s theoretical self-absorption. In the following, we resist such dualistic responses, which do not account for the wide range of relationships between feminist and postmodern enterprises, and we maintain that there is no shorthand way to characterise the differences and conjunctions between these two multifaceted discourses or movements.

Prevalent in academic circles, theoretical strands of postfeminism are informed by both postmodern and feminist analyses – as well as the complexities inherent in ‘postmodern feminism’. This understanding of postfeminism

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Postfeminism: Cultural Texts and Theories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction- Postfeminist Contexts 1
  • 1 - Backlash and New Traditionalism 51
  • 2 - New Feminism- Victim vs. Power 64
  • 3 - Girl Power and Chick Lit 76
  • 4 - Do-Me Feminism and Raunch Culture 91
  • 5 - Postmodern (Post)Feminism 106
  • 6 - Queer (Post)Feminism 124
  • 7 - Men and Postfeminism 132
  • 8 - Cyber-Postfeminism 145
  • 9 - Third Wave Feminism 156
  • 10 - Micro-Politics and Enterprise Culture 166
  • Afterword- Postfeminist Possibilities 178
  • Bibliography 180
  • Index 196
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