Postfeminism: Cultural Texts and Theories

By Stéphanie Genz; Benjamin A. Brabon | Go to book overview

Afterword: Postfeminist Possibilities

In this book we have investigated a number of different understandings and interpretations of postfeminism. Our analysis has allowed us to build up a comprehensive view of varied and multifarious texts, contexts and theories that contribute to and inform the postfeminist landscape. We have suggested that postfeminism’s meanings arise (inter) contextually, often mingling seemingly incompatible strands of feminism, popular culture, academia and politics. We have described postfeminism as a transitional moment that addresses the complexities and changes that modernisation and detraditionalism have brought about in contemporary Western societies. Rather than adopting a unitary definition, we have sought to explore postfeminism’s most prominent, controversial and productive uses and meanings, ranging from backlash to postfeminist micro-politics.

Throughout this book our guiding principle has been our conviction that an expanded and nuanced understanding of postfeminism opens up – rather than closes down – critical debates on the state of contemporary feminisms and the work of the feminist cultural critic. We have pursued avenues of investigation that have previously been neglected, proposing among other matters that postfeminism engenders a potentially rewarding political stance for the new millennium that brings into play diverse forms of individual agency. However, we have also been alert to the fact that postfeminism as a conceptual category and discursive system is still under construction and cannot escape a certain amount of confusion and contradiction. In particular, we have highlighted that postfeminism encompasses an inherently ’impure’ signifying space that mingles progress and retrogression, collusion and critique, resistance and recuperation. As Patricia Mann describes

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Postfeminism: Cultural Texts and Theories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction- Postfeminist Contexts 1
  • 1 - Backlash and New Traditionalism 51
  • 2 - New Feminism- Victim vs. Power 64
  • 3 - Girl Power and Chick Lit 76
  • 4 - Do-Me Feminism and Raunch Culture 91
  • 5 - Postmodern (Post)Feminism 106
  • 6 - Queer (Post)Feminism 124
  • 7 - Men and Postfeminism 132
  • 8 - Cyber-Postfeminism 145
  • 9 - Third Wave Feminism 156
  • 10 - Micro-Politics and Enterprise Culture 166
  • Afterword- Postfeminist Possibilities 178
  • Bibliography 180
  • Index 196
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