Intercultural Communication: A Critical Introduction

By Ingrid Piller | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
Intercultural Communication for
Sale

7.1 CHAPTER OBJECTIVES

It has become a truism that in today’s globalised world commodified cultural and linguistic symbols and imagery rapidly circulate around the globe and turn up in unexpected places (Appadurai 1996; Hannerz 1996). For example, in September 2010 I visited Hakone, a small tourist town about 100km west of Tokyo. Expecting an ‘authentic’ Japanese experience after having visited global Tokyo, I was more than a little surprised when I found that Hakone station was dominated by Swiss imagery. There was a large billboard of Swiss Tourism with an image of Disentis/Mustér, a small Swiss town in the canton of Graubünden. The billboard was as much a celebration of the fact that the Hakone Tozan Railway is a sister railway of the Rhaetian Railway operating in Graubünden as it was an invitation to visit Switzerland. Even the umlaut in the original German spelling of ‘Rhätische Bahn’ was there–as was the abundant use of the national colour red, the Swiss Tourism emblem which has the Swiss Cross at the heart of an edelweiss, the national flower, and the current Swiss Tourism slogan, ‘Get natural’. In close proximity to the billboard, there was the Cafe St. Moritz, named after another famous resort town in Graubünden. The Cafe St. Moritz, too, was liberally displaying the Swiss flag, including on table tops designed in the shape of the Swiss cross in a circle (see Piller (2010b) for images).

In this example Swiss symbols and the tokenistic use of the German language reference one tourist space (Hakone) to another (Graubünden/ Switzerland) and they associate a modest train-station food outlet with the glitz and glamour of St Moritz. Advertising takes cultural and linguistic symbols and images from one place and uses them in another to create authenticity, to reference an original, and to transfer the positive associations of a cultural or linguistic stereotype onto a product.

-96-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Intercultural Communication: A Critical Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 198

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.