Post-Classical Hollywood: Film Industry, Style and Ideology since 1945

By Barry Langford | Go to book overview

Introduction

The Hollywood film industry compels and receives universal attention, and for obvious reasons: for most of the last 100 years, Hollywood has set the terms of global film culture, and while that pre-eminence has frequently been criticised it has – notwithstanding the many other worldwide centres of cinematic excellence, some of them extremely successful – yet to be seriously challenged. Indeed, as I will repeatedly have cause to note in this book, an important dimension of Hollywood’s enduring success has been its facility in adopting and adapting the attributes and the technical and stylistic innovations of its competitors, from pre-World War I Italy and Scandinavia to Weimar Germany, through the European New Waves of the 1960s, and on to Bollywood and Hong Kong today.

Since the end of World War II above all, Hollywood has been without question the dominant global film industry. The seven decades since 1945 have certainly confronted American cinema with challenges and crises that could not easily have been – and were not – anticipated as the Hollywood studio system prepared in 1945 to enjoy the fruits of victory (Hollywood’s own contribution to the war effort having enhanced its public profile and reputation). Notwithstanding these challenges, and the era-defining social, political and economic changes that gave rise to them, by the end of the so-called ‘American century’ Hollywood’s worldwide dominance remained self-evident – indeed, in a largely borderless global economy the products of the American entertainment industry are more ubiquitous now than ever.

Yet today’s ‘Hollywood’ – that is, the ‘filmed entertainment’ divisions of the transnational media conglomerates NewsCorp, Sony, Time Warner, Walt Disney, GE1 and Viacom, alongside numerous ‘mini-majors’ and independent production companies of various kinds – and how it differs from the old studios of popular legend, remains obscure to most of its audience. This misunderstanding testifies partly to the confusing, ramified and multi-dimensional

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Post-Classical Hollywood: Film Industry, Style and Ideology since 1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Part I - Hollywood in Transition 1945–65 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Autumn of the Patriarchs 11
  • Chapter 2 - The Communication of Ideas 45
  • Chapter 3 - Modernising Hollywood 73
  • Part II - Crisis and Renaissance 1966–81 97
  • Chapter 4 - The Changing of the Guard 107
  • Chapter 5 - New Wave Hollywood 133
  • Chapter 6 - Who Lost the Picture Show? 157
  • Part III - New Hollywood 1982–2006 181
  • Chapter 7 - Corporate Hollywood 191
  • Chapter 8 - Culture Wars 219
  • Chapter 9 - Post-Classical Style? 245
  • Conclusion- ‘Hollywood’ Now 269
  • Appendix 285
  • Further Reading 287
  • Index 295
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