The American Short Story since 1950

By Kasia Boddy | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Sequences and Accumulations

Throughout this book, I’ve suggested that when reading a short story we tend to take account, consciously or unconsciously, of the context in which it appears: whether in a magazine, surrounded by a variety of other kinds of writing, in a volume of stories ‘selected’ by single author, in a multi-authored collection arranged around a common theme, or in an anthology labelled ‘the best’ (of one category or another). Where we read the story shapes the expectations we bring to our reading of it, and thus the effect it has on us. It was not the same experience to encounter a Barthelme story in the little magazine Art and Literature, sandwiched between Jean Genet and spatial theory, as it was to read one in the New Yorker, with cartoons and light verse cutting into its three-column layout. More recently, Joyce Carol Oates, reviewing George Saunders’s Pastoralia, noted how different his ‘goofy riffs on the travails of freaks and losers who sometimes manage to rise, only just barely, to the human’ seemed when collected between hard covers and in their ‘original settings in the columns of the New Yorker, amid glossy advertisements for high-priced merchandise’. In the magazine setting, she argued, the stories recall the ‘spectacle’ of lunatics provided for the.’ voyeuristic fascination/revulsion of those eighteenth-century European aristocrats who visited asylums’.1 Short stories appear in many places and thus gain, or lose, from many contexts. Susan Minot’s ‘Thanksgiving Day’, for example, which was written for her creative writing class at Columbia, was first published in the little magazine Grand Street and then in an anthology of ‘best’ new stories by ‘young writers’, and finally in what her publishers suggested she call a novel, Monkeys, as one of six chronologically arranged stories about a single family2 Another story that ended up in Monkeys, ‘The Navigator’, also appeared first in Grand Street, then in volume of women’s writing, in a collection of stories about alcoholism and in a book of stories set on beaches.3

-117-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Short Story since 1950
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 178

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.