A Vietnam Trilogy: Veterans and Post Traumatic Stress, 1968, 1989, 2000

By Raymond Monsour Scurfield | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4. TRYING TO MOVE ON

Although I did not realize it at the time, the four years following my return from Vietnam in 1969, my early readjustment from war to civilian life, reflected my altered relationship with my country. I was “not a Vietnam vet.”

For several years, I did not think much about the fact that I was a Vietnam veteran. I was not ashamed; I didn’t have negative feelings about being identified as a Vietnam veteran; nor was I consciously attempting to deny my status to myself or to anyone else. Overall, I felt good about what I did during my Vietnam tour, and I still was under the belief that we had been doing the right thing in Vietnam. I was just moving along in my life. However, I did have issues regarding my Vietnam tour. When I rotated from Vietnam back Stateside, to the Valley Forge Army General Hospital, I had four months left of my two-year active duty commitment. VFGH had a large amputee ward filled with Vietnam veterans; however, as the chief social worker on the psychiatric ward, I don’t think I ever even visited the amputees — a sign of avoiding my Vietnam?


NO PLACE LIKE HOME? I WANT TO GO BACK TO ASIA

As my time at VFGH was drawing to an end, I came to a startling realization: I felt extremely uncomfortable being back in the United States. The country seemed foreign to me. What had been important to me before the war, and continued to be important to others, seemed inconsequential: sports, politics and current affairs, “settling down” and establishing myself in a community.

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Vietnam Trilogy: Veterans and Post Traumatic Stress, 1968, 1989, 2000
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.