The State Park Movement in America: A Crictical Review

By Ney C. Landrum | Go to book overview

Preface

This is not—nor was it intended to be—the definitive history of America’s state parks. In fact, it might not properly be regarded as a history at all. Although I have attempted to trace the course of the state park movement over the past hundred years or so, and to fully acknowledge the many successes it has achieved, a collateral purpose of this “critical review” has been to raise concerns about questionable developments of the recent past and the influence they might have on the movement’s future direction. These are my personal views, of course, based on forty years of direct participation and observation in state parks work. I certainly do not expect everyone to agree with my assessment, but I hope they will at least do me the favor of hearing me out.

My primary object in undertaking this study was simply to take a critical look at the central idea of the state park “movement” in the United States; to track its evolution, examine its causes, note its many divergent paths, and perhaps assess what might be called its successes and failures. In doing so, I was not concerned directly with individual state parks—of which there are thousands—or even with discrete state park systems. I have sought to keep my focus on the movement itself, involving all fifty of the state park systems, as a major social and environmental phenomenon primarily of the twentieth century.

State parks occupy a central position in the overall gamut of public outdoor recreation, bridging the critical gap—often a yawning chasm—between the largely playground types of recreation provided by America’s cities and towns and the contrasting backcountry recreational experiences available in the vast national parks. Because the national parks are still relatively few and generally remote, the types of recreation they provide would likely never be accessible to much of the population except through the similar offerings of the more numerous and closerto-home state parks. Providing this vital link is, or should be, the essential purpose of every state park system.

Prototypes of the state park actually started springing up here and there long before the term itself came into use. Before anyone—even the most farsighted of the conservation pioneers—had a clear notion of what a state park system might

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The State Park Movement in America: A Crictical Review
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.