The State Park Movement in America: A Crictical Review

By Ney C. Landrum | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am indebted to many people and organizations for assistance in bringing this project to fruition—far too many, regrettably, to acknowledge them all individually. Foremost among them, though, are the National Association of State Park Directors, which sponsored the project from its inception, and the numerous individuals who served as state park directors during this time and who responded so promptly and completely to my many requests for information and assistance. I want to thank especially the four NASPD presidents with whom I worked during this period—David Weizenicker of Wisconsin, Fran Mainella of Florida, Ken Travous of Arizona, and Phil McKnelly of North Carolina—and also the members of the editorial advisory committee appointed by NASPD to hold my hand along the way: Jerry Pagac of Indiana, Wayne Perock of Nevada, and Chazz Salkin of Delaware. As executive director of NASPD, Glen Alexander graciously assisted me with numerous administrative details.

Many individuals in the Department of the Interior and the National Park Service provided valuable assistance. Principal among these were Tom Ross and Wayne Strum of the Park Service’s National Center for Recreation and Conservation, Joe DuRant of the Harpers Ferry Center, and all of the courteous and helpful staff of the Department of the Interior Library. Lee Furr, the able overseer of the Joseph Lee Memorial Library at the National Recreation and Park Association, provided absolutely indispensable help during my many days rummaging through the collections there. My thanks also to Dr. Rebecca Conard of Middle Tennessee State University for the use of photographs from her collection.

As this was my first real venture into the esoteric world of book publishing, I would have been completely lost without the constant guidance and advice of the staff of the University of Missouri Press. I am grateful for their invaluable assistance, as well as their infinite patience.

And, finally, my greatest debt is owed my long-suffering wife, Matilde, without whose continuing interest, encouragement, and support this book would never have seen the light of day.

-xv-

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