The State Park Movement in America: A Crictical Review

By Ney C. Landrum | Go to book overview

4
The Momentum Builds
State Parks Expansion in the Early Twentieth Century

The Tenor of the Times

After a half-century of trial and error, the state park idea at the dawn of the twentieth century at least had something of a track record. True, a mere handful of states had actually tested the concept, and several of those efforts had been less than impressive—some even outright failures. But the undeniable success of such high-profile projects as Niagara Falls, Itasca, and Valley Forge surely must have caught the attention of park advocates elsewhere around the country, sparking interest where there had been none and offering encouragement for preservation efforts already underway.

Whether it was itself a natural side effect of societal change or a purely serendipitous occurrence, the increased public awareness of state parks could not have been more timely. The turn of the century was generally a time of prosperity and optimism in the United States—a period of enlightenment that produced a number of progressive causes and campaigns, including what some have called a “back-to-nature” movement. Especially in the Northeast and the Midwest, many of the intelligentsia and the civic-minded leadership (the “do-gooders,” if you will) were seeking out places to save and the means to save them. One possibility of course was to promote their pet project as a new national park—an increasingly popular idea at the time—but that would require congressional action, a lengthy and uncertain process at best. So, what about a more homegrown alternative—like a state park? It was a novel, but intriguing, idea.

Although a standard concept of a “state park” still had not gelled—nor was the term itself yet in general use—the growing number of successful projects none-

-48-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The State Park Movement in America: A Crictical Review
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.